A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet #1)

Author: Madeleine L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time

Pages: 211

Genre: fiction, sci-fi, children, classic, fantasy, young adult

It was a dark and stormy night;

Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger. 

“Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me be on my way. Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract”.

Meg’s father had been experimenting with this fifth dimension of time travel when he mysteriously disappeared. Now the time has come for Meg, her friend Calvin, and Charles Wallace to rescue him. But can they outwit the forces of evil they will encounter on their heart-stopping journey through space?


Thoughts: Ever since I read this book years and years ago, I remembered it as one of my favourites, until the other day, when I realised that I couldn’t actually remember why I loved it. I’d forgotten everything about it, except that I had enjoyed reading it. So, after I finished my last book, I straight away picked this one up, and finished it overnight. And, it is just as good as I remember. The strange storyline, and the peculiar, though lovable characters soon all came back to me, and I can still say that A Wrinkle in Time is one of my favourite classic books.

“It was a dark and stormy night.”
― Madeleine L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time

I actually love the fact that the first line is the often mocked, “It was a dark and stormy night” phrase. This was not the first novel to use the line, that award goes to Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1830 book, Paul Clifford. But, it does not diminish the quality of book at all. In any case, I’d say it enhances it, because as you read that first line, and then the first page, and amazing writing really hits you with impact. The first paragraph features such wonderful descriptions, that I had to read it out loud a couple of times, to myself and members of my family. It’s just amazing.  And then the story starts.

“Life, with its rules, its obligations, and its freedoms, is like a sonnet: You’re given the form, but you have to write the sonnet yourself. – Mrs. Whatsit”
― Madeleine L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time

The plot is a very well thought out plot, and you would have to really know what you’re talking about to be able to write it. It’s not a usual fantasy novel, that if you’re creative enough, you can write; it involves quite a bit of science, and of course travelling in time (that is what creates a sci-fi novel), and it’s all mixed together marvellously to create an interesting plot. You would have no idea how it would resolve after reading the first half of the story. It keeps you hidden in the dark all the way through, until the end, which I think is a part of being a well-written novel. If it’s too predictable, then what’s the point in reading it?

“A straight line is not the shortest distance between two points.”
― Madeleine L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time: With Related Readings

I also absolutely adore the characters in A Wrinkle in Time. First off, it features a female lead, which I always enjoy. And it’s not as though Meg (the lead) didn’t have faults; she had quite a few, but there was soooooo much development for her, and this strengthens her even more. I also loved Charles Wallace, Meg’s younger brother, and the voice and input he gave the story. And then who couldn’t love the three Mrs W’s. Mrs Whatsit, the loveable and kind, brings these values to the book. Mrs Who, who was a little stranger, I also liked. She speaks mainly in quotes, which I grew to like from her, and then there was the even stranger Mrs Which. She is the more philosophical guardian of Meg and her brother. I feel like all the characters involved all had a purpose in the book. They weren’t just for show, or were meaningless. They were all there for a reason, so there was no rambling on about things we didn’t need to know. This also means that I loved all of them, because there isn’t too many of them.

“Have you ever tried to get to your feet with a sprained dignity?”
― Madeleine L’EngleA Wrinkle in Time

In general, I think everyone should have the chance to read A Wrinkle in Time. It’s written well, it has amazing descriptions, is fast-paced if you don’t like slow books, and it has a lovely feel to it. It is written so children can read it, so older people could find it a little young, or not for them, but I loved it. It’s also only the first book in the Time Quintet, which I did not realise until about three days ago, so I must get around to reading the other four. I don’t think you need to though, as it does finish alright. There is a bit of a cliff-hanger, but I think the complication of this book is resolved nicely.

Rating: 5-start

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2 thoughts on “A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet #1)

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